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  1. Last Call I'd like to thank everyone in this faction for their involvement in Porno Joe's progression. I look forward to watching this faction progress, I wish you all nothing but the best in your future endeavors. Saaaaaaaaaaalud.
    20 points
  2. Eugene Kilhaney is a recently released fifty year old convicted felon. He serves under Francis MacArthur, a gruesome criminal and supposed boss of the MacArthur Organized Crime Group as his second-in-command. Kilhaney was born in Los Santos to a poor, La Mesa based family. His mother, a local prostitute, raised Kilhaney without his absent father. Mimicking similar upbringings, Kilhaney dropped out of school at the young age of sixteen to pursue a life of crime. Infamous for his burly figure, Kilhaney was recruited by local La Mesa loansharks as their debt collector. It was there where he and MacArthur crossed paths. MacArthur headed up a lucrative loansharking scheme, comprising of small low level crooks to collect MacArthur's outstanding loans. The brawny Kilhaney quickly caught the eye of the Scot through his merciless means of collecting debts, his keen eye for robbing the right places and his success in recruiting new members to MacArthur's posse. Throughout the early-to-mid 2000s, Kilhaney worked closely with MacArthur and his gang of thieves, rising through the ranks to become the second-in-command. However, in December 2009 both he and MacArthur, as well as fellow associate Ronald Lynch were arrested. The charges show Kilhaney had a part to play in the severe beating of two local bookmakers who were accused of skimming profits and not paying their dues to the duo. Kilhaney was doomed to ten years in prison, MacArthur to eleven. Without their figureheads at the helm, the MacArthur Gang quickly disbanded. Now, a decade later of scheming and planning, Kilhaney has been released from prison with orders from MacArthur to reform the gang and bring back their golden era. ((OOC note: Eugene Kilhaney is my new character. I'm excited to start a new chapter of roleplay. This thread will showcase screenshots of Kilhaney's character and criminal life.))
    9 points
  3. This is like asking what a good writer is in that you'll never be able to provide a complete answer, however good roleplayers generally: 1) Write convincing dialogue for their characters. I hate trite and cliched dialogue. I like people who can write mobster characters who don't instantly remind you of someone from The Sopranos. Similarly, I like high ranking criminals who actually feel intimidating in the way they speak - because you don't run a continuing criminal enterprise without being able to affect a very real threat of violence in your speaking. (Some prison roleplayers are really good at roleplaying inmates who are genuinely scary presences in a scene.) I like people who can write good accents, lingo and local vernacular in their dialogue. 2) Avoid purple prose. No one cares. Really. If your character is swigging from a beer bottle then just say that - don't dedicate three paragraphs to the process. Good roleplayers say what they need to and they do it succinctly. They use as many words as necessary. They avoid tired or clumsy metaphors. They can turn a phrase when it's needed, but they also show enough restraint to keep a scene moving. 3) Have an actual character. Real people have motivations and histories that shape their motivations. Real people are conflicted and complex and messy. They're prone to mistakes. They have regrets, some fleetingly but some that linger. All of this complexity needs to be brought into your characters. And then the good roleplayer will allow it to seep into the roleplay over time - rather than unloading a bunch of backstory with all their motivations in a single expository scene. Real characters aren't always sad, happy or guarded - even if they might tend more towards some feelings than others. Supporting characters in movies serve a very specific function, so they often don't have the depth you'd need to bring them into a roleplay setting. Better inspirations can be found in TV series like The Wire - where you spend hundreds of hours with characters and get a much clearer sense of what they're like in all manner of circumstances. 4) Know their characters. Good roleplayers don't need scripts. They have a sense of how their characters will react to certain situations and can often improvise with them. This is hard and requires practice to ensure you are responding as your character and not just as yourself. 5) Know how to use grammar and spell words. Seriously. I am so glad we got rid of '-..'. Use punctuation properly. Try and spell properly. Use words you know the definition of to avoid confusing people. 6) Appreciate that characters change over time. I have never supported, for instance, roleplaying a 14-year-old and ageing them to be 18 over a couple of months. I don't believe the necessary development of four years of teenhood can be stuffed into a few weeks. I'd rather have a character with a rich backstory written prior to the start of roleplay. You can then think about how they might change based on what they experience - and these changes will often be subtle and gradual. Having a character who adjusts based on their engagement with others is very satisfying for those other players. 7) Try and learn proactively. No one will ever be perfect. Good roleplayers ask questions about what it is they're roleplaying and about roleplay generally. They reflect and they self-criticise. They seek out feedback and respond to it. They don't just plod along unthinkingly. Those are seven of many points about what good roleplayers do. Other stuff: I don't think it matters if a roleplayer can play a cop convincingly if they have no interest in doing that. What matters is how good they are at playing what they do currently. Joe Pesci basically only ever plays mobsters but who cares? He's awesome at it. Denzel Washington tends to play characters who sound alike, but he does it with so much depth. People should know as much as they need to to enhance their character portrayals. I don't know how to fly a plane - but that's not relevant to any of my characters and so it doesn't matter.
    6 points
  4. A New Beginning 새로운 시작
    6 points
  5. And a final two paragraphs to round up the story:
    6 points
  6. I've had one of the best experiences on GTA World whiles being a part of this faction. Nothing but great memories with you guys. I really wish you guys the all best in the future and I hope you guys will continue keeping up the awesome roleplay! Love each and one of you boys! MFFM
    5 points
  7. Short description: Rework the script with regards to stolen vehicles, restrict commands and rework /reportstolen and /reportfound, rework 911 / 991 script to accomodate an automated process. Detailed description: Currently, as far as I understand it there's no connection between the MDC and the game with regards to a vehicle being stolen. I think the entire system ought to be reworked with the current commands /reportstolen and /reportfound being accessible only to LEO's, and that players have to use either 911 or 991 to report their vehicles being stolen. You could possibly have an automated system which triggers when the player mentions keywords during the 911 call, with the system asking them questions which could lead to an automated 911 for us on duty with basic information (Vehicle, license plate, listed colors, last seen location).The reason is two fold, currently we have no way to contact the owner who has reported their vehicle stolen because they do not leave their number, nothing is listed in the emergency database because there's been no call with the current script system in place, and with the existence of the emergency database there'll be history to see how often vehicle's are stolen. When the script fails to properly identify the call as a stolen vehicle type, that's when we should have access to the command /reportstolen to manually report it, or during cases where a person comes up to us during patrol with no 911 call made. In those cases the command should give us the option to also put in a valid number, so /reportstolen [licenseplate] [number] so that the officer who finds the car can call the owner back.There should be an active list on the main page of the MDC detailing all the vehicles currently stolen, the same one you're able to see when you type /stolenvehicles. The only tool to see whether a vehicle is stolen is through the ALPR at the moment, or if you are mindful enough to use the command /stolenvehicles with some regularity while on duty. The MDC should ping when you run a plate on the DMV database stating that the vehicle is reported stolen when it is. Commands to add: Rework /reportstolen to only be LEO accessible, change the syntax to be /reportstolen licenseplate telephonenumber, have the script auto generate info regarding vehicle colours from the license plate when issuing a dispatch message to LEO. Have /reportfound only be accessible by LEO. Players must call 911 or 991 to report their car stolen, the 911 script can ask questions if it picks up words like stolen, so that it can be an automated process to report the vehicle stolen. Questions it would ask would include location, last time vehicle was seen, license plate, and the script would auto generate colors from the MDC database when issuing the dispatch. The command /reportstolen is for times when the 911 script doesn't activate with regards to vehicle theft, or when a person manually reports it. Items to add: How would your suggestion improve the server? It would be a major improvement with regards to the entire aspect of handling vehicle thefts. Additional information:
    4 points
  8. Someone who values your experience as much as you value theirs.
    4 points
  9. Little night in Little Seoul 공동체
    4 points
  10. The Planning & Execution! Later that night - Karma is a bitch! I'm a little late with posting the screens for this situation, but I've enjoyed all the RP before and after this whole thing. I'm sad with the way it had to go, but orders are orders. I wish the guys the best of luck in the future, but for now Alexanders story continues.
    4 points
  11. Short description: Allow players to choose between harvesting bud or harvesting seeds when growing weed on the server. Currently you receive a seed back from 1/3 plants during harvest. I believe that a new command, /harvestseed should be added to the server. When used, the grower would receive 3-6 seeds and no weed from the plant. Detailed description: I think everyone can agree that a lot can be done to improve the drug system on this server, while I think a full overhaul of the system won't come for awhile, I believe there are small yet significant changes we can make to improve drug RP quality of life. The current weed system lends its self to a small group of growers buying seeds directly from suppliers. While this lends greatly towards creating a high demand and rarity surrounding weed on the server, it doesn't do much for creating roleplay. By adding the ability to harvest seeds from plants, we can increase the amount of players who can build smaller scale farms. Seeds would still originate on the server through suppliers, but adding the ability to harvest seeds would create a market where smaller factions that might not be the first in line to buy seeds from a supplier have the ability and chance to create smaller, more sell sustaining weed farms. Commands to add: /harvestseed Items to add: N/A How would your suggestion improve the server? For illegal RPers: I currently run a weed farm on the server, the current system is incredibly boring. The system its self could be enjoyable if it wasn't so tied into the supplier drops each month. I get between X and Y seeds each month, because that's all I'm getting for a month there is really no room for expansion or error even. Short of becoming a drug suppler there just isn't enough seeds a month where I could expand and create some cool RP that involves other players while still growing the weed I need to supply my factions needs. By adding /weedharvest to the server, myself and others would be capable of producing while expanding. Getting more people involved in our RP. It would also open up more opportunities for other players who aren't in connection with a supplier the ability to open their own smaller scale farms. Right now, unless your a supply it's no where in your best interest to resell the seeds you've got. But if you were able to stretch those supplier seeds a little longer you could sell them to those around you. For LEO RPers: Raiding someones apartment or a stash house is one thing, but taking down a grow op deals a significant blow to any organization. As the investigations bureau continues to grow, So does the need for important criminal figures. /harvestseed creates more long form criminal RP for you to investigate because it will drastically increase the amount of people who will be able to operate farms. Additional information:
    3 points
  12. Steady Bkashin On Rivalz
    3 points
  13. Prison Life - Planning the future & making friends Freedom - Catching up with old friends & figuring out future plans
    3 points
  14. LOS SANTOS POLICE DEPARTMENT INTRODUCTION The Los Santos Police Department is the largest and longest-standing law enforcement faction on GTA:World, having existed since the server’s inception in 2017. We aim to offer an authentic Law Enforcement Officer roleplay experience, with our faction constantly improving and updating to bring us in-line with our real-life counterpart whilst maintaining a balance with the server and game. We are always looking for players who want to help us develop the faction further, so if you’re interested please see our recruitment topic on the LSPD forums, made available further down in this thread. HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT The Los Santos Police Department was founded in 1853 during the San Andreas Gold Rush and consisted primarily of a voluntary militia. Due to its location, San Andreas was known for violence with Los Santos becoming one of the most dangerous cities in the United States for several years during this period. The militia group, known as the ‘San Andreas Rangers’ eventually formed the first paid police force when they were merged with another militia company, the Los Santos City Guards, in 1869. The next twenty years would be a turbulent period that saw a total of fifteen Police Chiefs occupy the leadership role until Police Chief William C. Rockford took office and held the position for ten years - overseeing sweeping reforms that turned the department into a cohesive Law Enforcement Agency. The next 100 years for the department saw it grow into the large, municipal department that it is today. In 1911 the first female officer was sworn into service, three years before the outbreak of World War I; and during both world wars, the department suffered a decrease in manpower as officers were called to serve in the armed forces. In the post-war periods, there was an increase in corruption within the department that anti-corruption teams spent the next decades trying to eradicate, accentuated by the Bloody Easter scandal in 1952 that brought the issue of police brutality to the forefront. Pictured: LSPD Rifle Team, 1890 As one of the largest police departments in the country, the Los Santos Police Department was affected by almost every major event in the 20th Century that involved the country. With these events, the department grew and adapted, sometimes for the better, sometimes not so much. Some key events that shaped the department have been selected below. More will be added in the future. Downtown Vinewood Shootout On February 28th 1997, the Los Santos Police Department responded to a bank robbery that would set in motion major changes within the Department. Using body armour and a variety of high-calibre weapons, Garry Phelps Jr. and his accomplice Emilio Materasu attempted to steal a large sum of money from the vaults at the Pacific Standard Public Deposit Bank on Vinewood Boulevard. Officers arriving on the scene reported hearing gunfire from inside the bank and requested additional backup whilst holding the perimeter. Shortly before 0930, Phelps exited the building from the north side and immediately opened fire on nearby officers - wounding several officers and civilians, as well as forcing the LSPD’s helicopter to fall back before retreating inside again. Shortly afterwards, Materasu exited the building alongside him and engaged officers with automatic gunfire. The officers, who were armed with their standard-issue 9mm or .38 calibre weapons, were unable to penetrate the body armour worn by the suspects, and due to a combination of range and the suppression from automatic fire, were also unable to land shots to their unprotected heads. It wasn’t until the second ‘officer down’ call that the LSPD’s Special Weapons and Tactics was notified by dispatchers and requested on scene. Both Phelps and Materasu were able to regroup at their getaway vehicle, although Materasu was injured and forced to abandon the duffel bag of money and focus on starting the getaway vehicle. Phelps was also injured by officers when their gunfire struck his HK-91 rifle, forcing him to drop it and remove a new rifle from the vehicle. Materasu moved slowly through the parking lot at the rear as Phelps engaged officers whilst using the vehicle as cover. Once they reached the road, Phelps broke from the vehicle and proceeded to flee down the sidewalk on foot whilst Materasu drove down Clinton Avenue - forcing the officers on the northeastern side to fall back due to overwhelming fire. Phelps, at this point heading eastward on Clinton Avenue, continued firing his rifle at officers until it jammed just after the intersection with Power Street. Unable to clear the jam, Phelps discarded the rifle and drew his last remaining firearm - a Beretta 92FS and continued to engage officers. He was eventually hit in his right arm, forcing him to drop the pistol before retrieving it and turning it on himself. Officers continued to shoot at Phelps’ body for several seconds afterwards. Materasu, having continued to drive down Clinton Avenue, was halted when his vehicle was disabled by gunfire. He attempted to carjack a pickup truck he had blocked in the road, however, a SWAT team used a marked cruiser to approach the vehicle and block it in. The team exchanged close range fire with Materasu for a full two minutes before hitting him in his unprotected lower legs and forcing him to surrender. SWAT officers moved in to secure Materasu, pinning him down and handcuffing him. Materasu, having been heavily wounded, died from exsanguination before EMTs could be cleared into the scene to assist him. In the aftermath of the incident, the US Government began to approve the arming of regular patrol officers. In the LSPD, this saw the introduction of the AR-15 under the designation of the ‘Urban Patrol Rifle’. This rifle would be made available to regular patrol officers who passed the certification and not just to the LSPD’s Metropolitan Division. In addition to this, use of .45 calibre semi-automatic pistols were authorised for officers in the Department - with many opting to utilise the Smith & Wesson Models 4506 and 4566. CRASH & The Mission Row Scandal Originally formed as TRASH (Total Resources Against Street Hoodlums) in the early 1970s as part of Mission Row Area’s effort to combat the growing problem of street gangs, the name was changed to replace ‘Total’ with ‘Community’ due to complaints from the public that the acronym harmed the image of the youths joining the targeted gangs. CRASH, as it was now known, became a success and was expanded department-wide, with every division having its own CRASH unit operating from the station. The Mission Row Scandal happened in 1998 when Officer Luca Morales, a senior officer within Mission Row’s CRASH unit, was arrested following a lengthy internal investigation by detectives into corruption within the unit. The original investigation began after a sizable amount of cocaine was found to be missing from the station’s evidence locker and the evidence clerk involved with the removal was able to identify Morales as the one who signed it out due to his rude behaviour during the incident. In exchange for immunity against the majority of his crimes, Morales offered information and testimony to detectives that led to the investigation of a further 50+ officers. Pictured: Mission Row Community Police Station Morales’ testimony revealed a large number of officers that he claimed were ‘in the loop’ - a phrase used to describe an officer who was part of the ‘CRASH Culture’ which involved fabricating reports and probable cause, planting evidence, shooting unarmed suspects and planting weapons to justify their use of force, and sometimes even taking part in gang violence. One of the most notable incidents is a shooting in which Morales and his partner Wyatt Raines, a transfer from Vepucci’s CRASH unit that Morales had ‘sponsored’ due to their wives’ friendship, shot the unarmed Jose Oviedo in his home, before planting a weapon on him. Oviedo, then a member of a prominent street gang, was sentenced to 23 years in prison and was released following Morales’ testimony, eventually receiving $15 Million in damages - the largest police misconduct settlement in Los Santos’ history. In early 2000 CRASH was officially disbanded after slowly being diminished due to the Mission Row Scandal. The Gangs & Narcotics Division was created to replace it, with the requirements for entry being higher than CRASH and the officer requiring a high amount of experience, cleaner disciplinary record and low number of personnel complaints. In early 2000 CRASH was officially disbanded after slowly being diminished due to the Mission Row Scandal. The Gangs & Narcotics Division was created to replace it, with the requirements for entry being higher than CRASH and the officer requiring a high amount of experience, cleaner disciplinary record and low number of personnel complaints. Recent Events & Additions to Our History Future additions and amendments will be made to the history section as we flesh out the past of our faction so that we can use it to shape our future roleplay. Faction History The current iteration of the LSPD faction started when Peter Raymond became Chief of Department following a merger with the Sheriffs Department faction. He was assisted by Deputy Chief Elena Villarreal - the latter of which took over the role of Chief in August 2018 under the name Stanley Morrison. Under Morrison’s leadership, the LSPD faction began to flourish and most of the foundation of the faction as it is today was built. After a full year in the position, Stanley Morrison stepped down and was succeeded by Charles Hughes. Under Hughes, the faction has undergone some of it’s most drastic changes, all with the aim of creating a more realistic, more enjoyable faction for everyone. With focus on community interaction (both IC and OOC), and sticking to our core values as both a department and as a faction, the LSPD has now grown to numbers never before seen - and we hope that it will continue into the foreseeable future. OUR ETHOS & CORE VALUES Courtesy This is arguably a core value of the server and not just our faction, but we strive to exemplify it in our faction members/officers. Whether it’s offering directions or assistance to citizens in the server or being considerate to OOC situations that may affect other players; our faction members should always strive to help. Professionalism Once again we follow this core value both IC and OOC. As LEO roleplayers, we want to emulate the professionalism of our real-world counterparts as best we can. The faction/department has extensive self-checking and disciplinary procedures that help us make sure that our players/officers are behaving to the standard that we expect of them. Faction Leadership has always been clear that complaints regarding players/officers are handled seriously and encourages anyone with issues to report them lest they go unchallenged. We are proud of the level of professionalism in our players/officers and believe that our faction is one of the strongest in terms of this within the GTA V roleplay community. Respect Both IC or OOC, we respect the community and its citizens/players. As a Law Enforcement Agency, we aim to accurately portray our care and commitment to the city and its citizens - but this also transitions into the real world. As the biggest faction on the server, we are especially conscious to listen to the feedback of community members on how the faction operates. The Faction Leadership often engage in conversations with other faction leaders, both legal and illegal, on how to improve the faction for the benefit of everyone, and our regular players can always be seen discussing things and helping players on the forums and discord. We do not condone the attitude that the LSPD faction is better because it’s law enforcement and/or bigger, and will always fight to improve things for the benefit of all players, not just our own. MEET THE STAFF TEAM Chief of the Los Santos Police Department Name: Jocelyn Ingram Age: 54 Rank: Deputy Chief of Police Time In Department: 29 Years ((2 Years)) Joining the Department in 1991, Ingram spent a number of years as a Patrol Officer, Field Training Officer, and later Juvenile Crimes Detective. At the rank of Lieutenant, she would be reassigned to Internal Affairs, and later to Chief of Professional Standards following the departure of Professional Standards Chief Charles Hughes, where she would conduct a number of changes to Community Affairs, and work closely with the District Attorney's Office to modernize the investigation of internal criminal investigations and Use of Force. After the departure of Chief Vincent Lagorio, Ingram took the reins as interim Chief of Police. Chief of Staff Chief of Vacant Name: Jacqueline Coburn Age: 44 Rank: Police Administrator III Time In Department: 10 Years ((2 Years)) Coburn earned her Master's Degree in Public Administration, which was quickly put to use upon graduation. She has worked for the City of Los Santos since 1995. She spent half of her career working for the Office of the City Operations Officer, a charter office of the Los Santos City Government as a Legislative Analyst, working on the Public Safety and Housing committees. She was appointed to the Los Santos Police Department in 2011 following the Rockford administration shakeup at the time. She was appointed as a Police Performance Auditor, serving the Department’s Audit Division. Through hard work, she was promoted to Police Administrator II as the Commanding Officer of Audit Division. She worked with the Office of Chief of Police in this position until her appointment to Police Administrator III, equivalent to a Deputy Chief, as the Department’s Chief of Staff Name: Vacant Age: - Rank: Deputy Chief of Time In Department: - Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed tortor orci, pharetra nec interdum id, convallis vitae nulla. Integer non venenatis quam. Suspendisse pulvinar neque Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed tortor orci, pharetra nec interdum id, convallis vitae nulla. Integer non venenatis quam. Suspendisse pulvinar neque MEET THE COMMAND TEAM Commander Matias Ortega Commanding Officer, Office of Support Services Commander Branch Goodwater Commanding Officer, Counter-Terrorism and Special Operations Captain III Isaac Aurelio Commanding Officer, Metropolitan Division Captain III Cecilia Myers Commanding Officer, Community Engagement Division WALL OF HONOUR (FORMER FACTION LEADERSHIP) Chief of Police Peter Raymond 24/JUN/2018 - 02/AUG/2018 Chief of Police Stanley Morrison 02/AUG/2018 - 28/AUG/2019 Chief of Police Charles Hughes 28/AUG/2019 - 21/AUG/2020 Chief of Police Vincent Lagorio 21/AUG/2020 - 10/JAN/2021 Deputy Chief of Police Naomi Benevides 10/NOV/2019 - 09/MAR/2020 Deputy Chief of Police Nicholas Rodger 26/JAN/2020 - 07/JUL/2020 Deputy Chief of Police Samantha McGill 28/APR/2020 - 16/OCT/2020 Deputy Chief of Police Laura Romano 11/NOV/2020 - 16/NOV/2020 Deputy Chief of Police Thomas Hanlon 25/NOV/2019 -16/FEB/2021 Deputy Chief of Police Marquis Wilson 01/JAN/2021 - 15/JAN/2021 Deputy Chief of Police Michael Briggs 01/JAN/2021 - 15/JAN/2021 Deputy Chief of Police Orson Beckett 08/APR/2021 - 20/MAY/2021
    2 points
  15. If your RP is believable, engaging, and transparent to the point where your character is not questioned in any way shape or form.. you're a good roleplayer.
    2 points
  16. The Raton Canyon Race Callie Palencia The second season kicked off at the Raton Canyon! 10 racers took part in the new season The San Andreas Motorsport Association, initially called Rush in Automotive was founded back in 2019 by L. Miller and E. Coleman. Rush in Automotive eventually met up with the then mayor Vincent Rockford, and evolved into R-Motorsport Federation and it organised it's own championships, ever since the company has evolved into San Andreas Motorsport Association, they give out FIA and IMSA approved racing licenses as well. The Miller Racing team claimed victory in the R5 Group, hitting a 02:16.04 with a solid performance in his Flash GT. The Autoholics team scored a victory in the H5 Group with a 02:08.71 in their Sultan Classic, and finally Chris Rae, the independent driver won H3 Group with a 02:26.94 in his Savestra. Rogue Motorbike disrupting proceedings for about five minutes. The Fire Department and Los Santos Police was on site at the event conducting medical and road barriers. There was a brief incident on the track into the event, where LSPD had to escort a rogue motorbike from the track which was disrupting proceedings. There was no other incidents. Times and results: R5 Group Miller Racing Team: 02:16.04 (Driver: Lucas Miller Co-Driver: Avis Miller) (2 SARC Points) Bishop Racing; 02:24.84 (Driver Alex Bishop, Co-Driver: Moon Myung) (1 SARC Point) H5 Group Autoholics Motorsports: 02:08.71 (Driver: Eric Martini, Co-Driver: Katie Seounu) (2 SARC points) Guido Motorsports: 02:13.51 (Driver Alexis Thorne, Co-Driver: Albert Barney) (1 SARC point) Miller Racing Team: 02:14.39 (Driver: Kirsten Landry and David Torres) Independent: 02:15.24 (Driver: Lucas Levesque. Co-Driver: Tyler Hennessey) SRC Motorsports: 02:17.16 (Driver: Richard Ersatz, Co-Driver: Ayato Kogami) Autoholics Motorsports: 03:05.73 (Driver: Nathan Wilson, Co-Driver: Moon Myung) H3 Group Independent: 02:26.94 (Driver: Chris Banks, Co-Driver: Alexis Rae) (2 SARC Points) Independent: 02:29.15 (Driver: Alexis Rae, Co-Driver: Chris Banks) (1 SARC Point) Further Reading For all our photography, check out our Gallery Check out San Andreas Motorsports Association website! lsnn.gta.world
    1 point
  17. Hey, hi! So this is something I've wanted to do for a loooooong time but haven't really gotten around to it. With the Los Santos County Lifeguards thriving under the Los Santos Fire Department, I thought now would be a good time to show the story of my oldest, nearest and dearest character, Ami McKenna. Ami has been my most played character and has a long history on GTA:W - filled with failures and dreams who has finally found her calling in life - by pure chance of an accidental rescue one day down on Vespucci Beach. Ami means a heck of a lot to me. There was a brief period of time where I put her aside to start afresh after a major setback in her development - and I RPly sent her away to Alaska to continue her veterinary medicine studies as I had lost all ambition to play her. I brought her back around January to try and dig her out of the hole she was in and have fallen completely in love with playing her again and I don't see that changing. This will follow the development of Ami, from her escape to Alaska, to her return due to her husbands suicide - and how she managed to find hope through her conception and development of the Los Santos County Lifeguards. It'll take a little time to catch up to the present day, but I have so much content of her present day that I felt it's important to show how the Lifeguards came to fruition. I hope you enjoy ❤️
    1 point
  18. Short description: Add /vw as an alias for /vwindow Detailed description: Add /vw as an alias for /vwindow so it can be written faster Commands to add: /vw Items to add: none How would your suggestion improve the server? Would make you waste less time writing longer commands. Additional information:
    1 point
  19. they do. you show me a gangbanger that’s gotten away with 6 murders and is 100% mentally sound after all of them and I’ll show you an anomaly
    1 point
  20. Treat your character like they are NOT a disposable object. I've seen it too much nowadays that people kill off their characters when the going gets tough. When difficult situations and hardship presents itself to your character, work with it. Grab the kite and fly it, don't be lazy.
    1 point
  21. But why not just have something specifically linked to the dealership rather than handling it via player owned vehicles. Let the dealerships actually “own” vehicles. Let employees sell them and receive a % of the profit set by the dealership owner similar to how mechanics do it at garages. Then tax the dealerships per vehicle sale a certain %.
    1 point
  22. The solution for this is a tax based on assets total value of 5%, and a multiplier for every vehicle above the total number of 5 (maybe add an extra 0.5% to the 5% tax of assets for each other). This way you have to make sure that the business is successful and also restrict the profits, to make it realistic.
    1 point
  23. Name: Darren Jameson Comment: This is a comment.
    1 point
  24. Short description: A trash can should be added into the game. Detailed description: There should be trash cans at a few places around the map where people could throw their stuff which they don't want anymore, thus not making a system where you just have to drop your stuff on the ground when you don't need something. Commands to add: /trashcan Items to add: Trash cans around the map How would your suggestion improve the server? There would not be items dropped around the map, so people would not randomly pick up things from the ground. Additional information: An interface should be implemented with this, so that the navigation could be easier.
    1 point
  25. Hello everyone, This is an announcement in regards to the addition of sexual roleplay rules within the GTA:World community, as well as changes to the age limits of characters. We would also like to remind everyone that we do not and never have accepted pedophilia within the community. We punish any instances of this very harshly and will continue to do so. These rules are not an attempt to address a pattern of pedophilia in the community and they are simply to ensure that players on our server are being protected from predatory behaviour as well as to ensure that our heavy standards are being applied to all areas of the server. That being said, if you ever experience any instances of predatory behavior or pedophilia, you should contact an administrator with any evidence that you can gather. Even if you do not have evidence, it's recommended that you contact an administrator immediately so that it can be escalated and investigated. I ask that you please read through these new rule additions and familiarize yourself with them as they are going to be enforced at a high standard. I will attach a list of notable points that you should be made aware of: Characters are now no longer allowed to be under the age of 16, unless the character is made for the intentions of getting involved with gang roleplay and there is a reasonable justification for that character to be 12-15. Players who are OOCly under the age of 18 may NOT engage in any explicit sexual roleplay of any kind. They MUST take the responsibility to fade to black, which they have the OOC right to refuse to consent to. Players who are 18 or over the age of 18 should ensure that they do not willingly engage in explicit sexual roleplay with a minor. Characters who are under 18 may NOT participate in any explicit fully roleplayed sexual roleplay. If they engage with sexual roleplay with a character that is under 18, the roleplay must be skipped / faded to black. This does not apply to characters who are under 16 who may not fade to black nor roleplay it out. Characters who are under 18 may NOT be involved in any rape/sexual assault roleplay whatsoever, including fading to black. Characters who are under 18 may NOT be involved with sexual roleplay with a character who is 18 or over in any capacity, including fading to black. Character descriptions must be more neutral in nature. They should not be over sexualized and should properly describe the character in a neutral manner. PLEASE READ THE FULL CHANGELOG HERE: Why? These rules are being implemented to ensure that the GTA World staff team is properly protecting our players and that all of our players are not participating in any predatory fantasies. Although, I'd like to address that we have always been committed to protecting our players from predatory behaviour and will continue to do so; if you witness any predatory behaviour you are asked to please bring it up to a trusted Administrator. The reasoning that gang roleplayers are being given an opportunity to roleplay under 16 is for the simple reason that there's a justification and a realistic need for it. Other than gang roleplay, in the current climate of the server this is no justification to roleplay a character under 16 and we will not be allowing it to occur outside of gang roleplay. What Now? These new changes are being implemented immediately and should be adhered to by the entire community. Anyone who has any evidence of any predatory behaviour in the past may still contact any administrator in private. If you have a character that is affected by these new age limits: You must age your character up to fit the new server standards or remove the character within 48 hours Sincerely, FullyCanadian, on behalf of the GTA World Staff Team.
    1 point
  26. @Khaleesi wouldn't shut the fuck up about it
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  27. This is a bit overbearing, even by my standards. Who's to say I'm not portraying my character as a paranoid neurotic who would flee for seemingly no reason? Who's to say I don't have something in my car that I shouldn't have? Adding restrictions like this, where you don't reasonably know what's going through the other person's mind, is going to lead to reports that are unfounded. Undoubtedly, there are people that flee just for the thrill of a chase OOC and it goes against what their character would reasonably do - but there's already steps in place for you to deal with that. If you believe somebody is breaking server rules, you can /report them - if you believe they aren't portraying their character properly, you can raise your concerns with the RP Quality Team. Not to mention that with the points system in place, people who regularly evade for no particularly reason will soon find themselves nearing the 30 points required to imprison them indefinitely. I see no reason to add more limitations and restrictions for something that can already be resolved without it, like your point about people not roleplaying crashes - report them and it will be dealt with.
    1 point
  28. Introduction In this guide I'll be breaking down some of Central America's history, along with some things about the Maras (Gangs) that inhabit the region. I'll also go a little into how these Maras (Gangs) operate in the United States. This guide is being created with the aim to give those trying to roleplay a Central American something to put behind their character and also for inspiration. The gang portion of this guide will mostly be about the Mara Salvatrucha, but will also include the 18th Street gang in some parts. However, I will mainly be addressing MS-13 as the differences between the two street gangs are too slim for me to extensively talk about both gangs. Central America; An Overview Central America is a region in Latin America. The Central America region consists of a number of countries which control territories along the land bridge that connects Mexico to Colombia. These countries consist of Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. Like most Latin American countries, the primary language spoken in the streets and at home is Spanish, apart from in Belize (A former British colony) where they speak English instead. The usage of Spanish in Central America and amongst Central American individuals is distinct from the Spanish spoken in many other Latin American countries. A word that means one thing to a Colombian, could mean something completely different to a Salvadoran for example. Central Americans also commonly pronounce their Spanish words differently to most other Spanish speakers, sometimes leading to confusion In 2016 the combined population amongst the Central America region was thought to be around or over 44 million. Additionally in 2018 The population of Central America was estimated to be 47,448,333. Many countries in Central America are poor, poverty stricken, rife with corruption and generally suffer from a great deal of hardship as a result of various social and economic factors. Along with this, many of the countries in Central America countries suffer from extreme gang problems and extremely high homicide rates. In 2015 the city of San Pedro Sula in Honduras was said to have been the most dangerous city in the world. Additionally, cartels and other criminal organisations are known to use Central America as a gateway for drug trafficking through Mexico and into the United States and also for human trafficking to and from Colombia and other South American countries. In recent years a sizeable amount of Central Americans have fled the region as a result of the crippling gang problems that have plagued the region since the 1990's, these immigrants generally leave their homes bound for the United States where they generally intend to apply for a refugee status. Many are denied the refugee status and sent back to El Salvador, where alot of the time they end up dead as a result of the gangs that they fled to escape in the first place. Countries like El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala are overrun by gangs such as MS-13 and 18th Street and are also said to be operating in Costa Rica, Panama and as far south as Colombia. In addition to this, street gangs are also present in Belize. In Belize, offshoots of the Mara Salvatrucha, 18th Street and even offshoots of African American street gang sub-sets affiliated to the Crips and Bloods are also said to be present. Conflicts in Central America Since the forming of most Central American countries, the region has been rife with conflicts. One classic example of Central American conflicts was in the 1950's when Judge William Walker, a proponent of slavery attempted to subdue various parts of Central America. After a brief stint as the self proclaimed president of Nicaragua, he was ambushed and executed by local Salvadoran & Honduran revolutionaries. These revolutionaries that assassinated revolutionaries were affectionately nicknamed 'Salvatruchas' by the locals and were honoured throughout Central America for their heroic deeds against the tyrant 'president' of Nicaragua. The word Salvatruchas was later picked up by a certain Salvadoran gang, but we'll get to that later. Since then, many countries throughout Central America have been torn apart by brutal civil wars. In 1911 there was a civil war in Honduras. Another civil war took place in Guatemala between the years of 1960 and 1996. Among the most notable of these civil wars was the Salvadoran civil war of the 1980's, which began in 1979 after an Archbishop by the name of Oscar Romero was executed by the Salvadoran military while giving a speech. This came after years of civil strife throughout El Salvador as a result of a tyrannical government. The political party that was in charge was extremely corrupt. Some who were locals of Central America at the time talked about times where they'd vote for the opposite party, and if they started to win, the entire country's power would go out and when it came back, the ruling party would be winning on the poles. When the conflict initially began, the Salvadoran government was backed by the United States. Various war crimes took place on all sides and brutal violence became the norm and among the most shocking of these facts, is that for the most part, many of the soldier on either side were young children who were trained to be killers. The horrific violence ended up causing almost half of the country to flee. Some were lucky and managed to escape to other, safer countries such as Australia, Spain and others, but the vast majority of those fleeing Central America at the time ended up in the streets of Los Angeles (Los Santos), where they for the most part settled in the Koreatown district of that city. Smaller Salvadoran communities soon popped up in the districts of Mid City, Hollywood and the San Fernando Valley. Mara Salvatrucha, Barrio 18 and the origin of the Maras The term 'Maras' is a word that nowadays refers to a specific breed of street gang. A Latino street gang that was formed in the United States but managed to make its way to Mexico, Central America and other countries. The term Mara was originally coined to refer to a group, a gathering, a gang. Although the term Mara is said to nowadays have a more sinister meaning to it, coming from another Central American term, Marabunta. The term 'Marabunta' refers to a vicious breed of army ant known to devour and destroy everything it comes into contact with. The most known of the Maras is the MS-13 (La Mara Salvatrucha 13) and the 18th Street Gang (Mara 18) Other Maras include Salvadorans With Pride (SWP), Mao Mao (MM) Mara Maquina (MM2), La Mirada Loca (LML), Batos Locos (BL) and various other Central American street gangs. All Maras in El Salvador are gangs, but not all gangs in El Salvador are Maras however. The Surenos exist to a lesser extent in Central America. Offshoots of La Florencia, Playboys 13 and Crazy Riders are said to have been formed in many Central American countries such as El Salvador and Honduras. While there's a sizeable amount of Central American gangsters throughout the US and across the world, the majority of Salvadorans & Other Central Americans are typical hard working men and women. Most of them don't respect gangs, but instead fear and despise them. Salvadorans & Central Americans are the biggest victims of their own street gangs, especially in their home countries. Though in the United States, that's increased tenfold. To your average Salvadoran, an MS-13 or an 18th Streeter is nothing more than a monster. Despite this, there's those who sympathize with the gangs. Some Salvadorans & Central Americans willingly take the stand in court and lie for gang members, testify against rival gang members and even hide guns / drugs or attempt to cover up murders or other criminal acts such as rape for the local gangs. For the most part, these kinds of people see whatever gang is local to their neighbourhood as their family. Maybe they have friends in those gangs, or maybe they've even got family that represents those street gangs. It all depends on the person and the way they're bought up, or what they've experienced. Central Americans in Southern California (Southern San Andreas) generally stick together in the same tight knit communities. Large Salvadoran communities can be found in the Koreatown/Rampart/Pico-Union/Mid-Wilshire neighbourhood (Which is represented ingame as Little Seoul) along with others in Westlake & Silverlake (Mirror Park), East Hollywood (East Vinewood) and North Hollywood. In each of these Salvadoran communities that are dotted around La County, there's generally a presence of MS-13, who despite being generally disliked by the law-abiding Salvadoran community, they rule these communities with an iron fist due to the Salvadorans' fear of MS-13 and of what might happen if they co-operate with the police. Some fear deportation, some fear reprisal from the gang, some just can't bring themselves to speak on the people they've grown up around, most just want to mind their own business. Many young Salvadorans who arrived in LS during the 1970's joined existing gangs. A few of these gangs included Varrio Playboys 13, 18th Street and Crazy Riders 13, among others. While some gangs and communities in LA were welcoming to the newcomers, others treated them as sub-human trash. They would mock, bully, assault, stab and sometimes rape Salvadorans in broad daylight. This not only caused a fair amount of Salvadorans to dislike Mexican-Americans and also led to the forming of the Mara Salvatrucha Stoners (MSS) street gang. When the gang was formed, the original founders of the street gang combined the Salvadoran Spanish word 'Mara', meaning gang or Group with the term Salvatrucha, which was as mentioned earlier, a term used to honor the Salvadoran and Honduran revolutionaries who overthrew William Walker over a century beforehand. The word 'Stoners' was then added at the end of the gang's name, referring to the current membership of the gang, which were for the most part a bunch of raggedy haired teenagers with a taste for Marijuana and heavy metal music who banded together with eachother for protection in the streets. The Mara Salvatrucha Stoners initially had a culture which consisted of soft and psychedelic drug abuse, attendance at heavy metal concerts and a strong pride in defending their ethnic communities from outsiders and other gangs. Other instances of Anti Central-American prejudice had also taken place 30 years before the Mara Salvatrucha Stoners came onto the scene during the 1950's when the 18th Street Gang formed as a result of Clanton 14 and their refusal to accept members with ethnic roots that weren't exactly the same as them. This helped 18th Street to become a massive street gang that by the time the MSS showed up in the 1980's, the 18th Street Gang was already an established 'super-gang' with close to 20 offshoots and cliques throughout Los Angeles. At first, MS-13 and 18th Street got along. They'd often party together. It was at these parties that members of the Mara Salvatrucha Stoners heard about the bosses of La Eme (The M) and how they ran Southern California from the prisons. Throughout much of the 1980's the Mara Salvatrucha grew in the form of the Mara Salvatrucha Stoners, however by the turn of the decade, the Mara Salvatrucha were no longer a disorganised crew of kids who liked heavy metal and banded together to protect eachother, they were a new and vicious breed of street gang that had earned its own place in the hierarchy of the gang underworld. In the mid 1990's the gang dropped the 'Stoners' nickname and instead adopted the number '13' at the end of their name. Also in the 1990's, the United States began deporting thousands of gang members from Los Angeles and back to the Central American continent. Members of the Mara Salvatrucha and Dieciocho gangs were sent to El Salvador first, then the gangs started bleeding across the borders into the neighboring countries, The fact that many of these countries were still recovering from their conflicts caused both gangs to grow extremely fast. By the 2000's the Mara Salvatrucha and 18th Street gangs had not only spread throughout Latin America, but were now also present in several other states across the US. They had taken over entire neighbourhoods and were known to recruit children as young as 9-10 for their street gang wars and drug sales. Over the years as members of MS-13 got incarcerated in Central America, the gangs got much more organised, this especially happened after prisons began being dedicated to one street gang as opposed to holding members of both gangs. With the forming of the Maras in Latin America, other gangs began coming out of the woodwork. These Maras included the Mao Mao, an organisation that had been around since the Salvadoran civil war and evolved into a street gang that was mainly involved in money making. Also formed was the La Maquina (The Machine) gang in Apopa, which became vicious rivals of both the 18th Street and Mara Salvatrucha despite the gang's much smaller size. Other imported gangs from Los Angeles soon began popping up throughout Latin America aswell. Sureno gangs such as La Florencia, Playboy Surenos, Crazy Riders, Harpys and Ghetto Boyz are said to be present in Mexico and some parts of Central America. Maras in Central American countries run their neighbourhoods like mini dictatorships. Those who are unknown are usually assumed to rival gang members and are killed or disappeared, women are generally treated poorly in gang territories throughout Central America. Femicide and rape culture are extremely common problems throughout the slums of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras and especially amongst the gangs. Some of the more brutal MS and 18 cliques throughout Central America are also known to treat women associated with the gang as drug mules and sex objects. Some gang members are even known to abduct women from their communities and force them to either become prostitutes for the gang, or they claim them as their personal sex objects. In the early 2010's all Maras and other gangs in Central America were labelled criminal organisations. The Mara Salvatrucha as of 2020 is also labelled as a criminal organisation in the United States, with many MS-13 leaders from both the United States and Central America as of 2020 and 2021 being charged with terrorism offenses by the United States Government. 18th Street (Mara 18) in Central America is split into two seperate categories, the 18 Revolutionaries and the 18 Surenos. The Revolutionaries are much more ruthless, they have barely any rules and a lot of cliques require their members to perform a murder and/or a sexual assault in order to become part of their groups. Revolutionaries within 18st have also popped up in Los Angeles, where some 18th Street cliques such as a few smaller ones located in Westlake are rebelling against the Mexican-Mafia and against the other local Sureno gangs, aswell as being involved in a vicious war with MS-13 that involves sex crimes and the brutal murders of random civilians. El Salvador's MS-13 is also split into two separate factions, known within the gang as cars. La Ranfla Historica is the dominant faction in Central-America. For years they ran the gang from the confines of extremely crowded Salvadoran prisons. Despite this, some MS13 members felt that the leaders in these prisons were only making moves that benefited them, and not their homeboys or the gang at large. They were complying with the government, they were allowing their younger, craziest members to go around killing random women and raping women and children. Something that didn't sit well with this particular group of MS affiliates, some of which had come from Los Angeles after being deported. As a result, the '503' branch was formed within MS-13. Like the 18 Revo's in Los Angeles, 503 Mara Salvatrucha affiliates can also be found in Los Angeles. In addition to the gangs, other groups exist in El Salvador and also throughout Central Ameirca. In El Salvador, an organisation called 'La Sombra Negra' or The Black Shadow is known to hunt down and kill gang members. Locals attribute the black shadow to being mainly comprised of current and former law enforcement along with vigilantes. The general population of El Salvador supports groups like La Sombra Negra and they also support the government's extreme approach towrds containing the gangs. This is due to the vast majority of the Salvadoran population having family members who've fallen victim to the crimes of the local gangs. Many of them have brothers who were killed, sisters who were raped and/or forced to be prostitutes, family members who've been disappeared by the gangs. They want blood, not just justice. Some residents of other Central American countries also share similar views when it comes to the Maras. Often times when MS or 18 members identify themselves in countries throughout Central America, they're murdered by either the police, rivals or just vigilante civilians. The actions of vigilantes and also the actions of the governments of many Central American countries has forced the Maras somewhat underground. They still excersize the same iron fist like control over many regions of Central America, but have been forced much more into the shadows than before. Members of MS-13 and 18th Street in El Salvador and some parts of the United States have either dramatically lowered their use of tattoos, or no longer use tattoos at all as a result of these factors. Maras in the US (Present Day) Mara Salvatrucha and 18th Street in the United States are also split into various factions (Usually referred to as 'Programs'). These Programs are generally cells of the gang itself that generally consist of a leading council and a cluster of MS-13 cliques that are loyal to them. In the United States the Mara Salvatrucha's operations differ from state to state. Members of MS-13 in the mid-west are much more low-key with their crimes and are alleged to be involved in various financial crimes such as money laundering and fraud. MS-13 cliques in the Southern states (Apart from California) and also on the East-Coast generally operate similarly to their counterparts in Central America. MS-13 offshoots under the East Coast Program (A Mara Salvatrucha program which is led from Central America) have particularly strong presences in New York State, Virginia, Maryland and various other neighboring localities. Mara Salvatrucha operates very similarly to their East-Coast counterparts in southern states such as Georgia, Texas, Arizona, Florida and Louisiana. On the West Coast in states such as California (San Andreas) Oregon and Washington the Mara Salvatrucha operates in a much less violent manner, being much more focused on money than extreme violence. Though this is not to say that the Mara Salvatrucha in Los Angeles is in any way tame. In 2018/2019 members of the Mara Salvatrucha's Fulton Locos clique in North Hollywood were indicted for a killing spree that its members committed, in which it was found out that the culprits to the various brutal, medieval style murders were members of the MS-13's 503 Branch and were absorbed into the street gang's ranks in Los Angeles. The 503 Branch in Los Angeles is worlds different to the traditional Mara cliques you'll find in East Hollywood and Little Seoul. 503 Mareros believe in more violence and shocking brutality, while they for the most part don't condone rape, some of them do. Other MS-13 cliques in LA that aren't part of the 503 Branch are part of what's called the Los Angeles program, which is the governing body for MS-13 cliques in California. It's led via a coalition of MS veterans who call the shots for their respective cliques and by a Ranflero who commands them all. MS-13 in California don't pay dues to MS-13 in Central-America as it is commonly believed either. The Mara clicks on the Westcoast of the US don't see eye to eye with their counterparts in El Salvador, and instead hate and despise them. As far back as 2006 MS-13 had already stopped sending money to El Salvador. MS cliques in California are also distinct in that they're generally the most respected and organized cliques of the MS-13 gang. Members of MS-13 cliques based in Los Angeles who end up in Central America usually end up being absorbed MS-13 into cliques in their home countries that are named after Los Angeles streets. Additionally, many MS-13 cliques from LA have become so organized that they basically operate as gangs within the gang. This is seen in the Normandie Locos Salvatruchas clique, which has members all over the United States and in Latin America. Many members of the Normandie Locos communicate with members from neighbouring states and countries and this is generally seen with most other LA based MS-13 cliques. Along with this, many Los Angeles based Mara Salvatrucha cliques operate worlds differently from their counterparts in Central America and even in other states. This is mainly seen in how the gang in California has very strict rules about the way its members are to conduct themselves. Members of the MS-13 in California are required to pay a monetary fee to their clique's leadership simply for their membership in the gang, rape isn't tolerated, drive-by's are disallowed, disrespect towards members of the gang and their family members/loved ones aren't tolerated and additionally members are also barred from using drugs or alcohol on any day that isn't part of a weekend or holiday among other rules. Some rules are less enforced and will only end in a punishment that usually consists of a beating. However, if more rules are broken or a more serious rule is broken, harsher penalties are imposed on the offending gang member. These penalties can include additional monetary fees given to the clique's leadership, removal from the clique, beatings that sometimes include weapons such as bats and bladed weapons and in the worst cases, death. Additionally the Mara Salvatrucha in California is much more Americanized in that many of their Los Angeles based cliques accept females into their gangs as fully affiliated members. Mareras in Los Angeles are very rarely sexed in and are generally jumped in members. They're usually more vicious, cold and calculating than their male counterparts. This is due to the cold hearted nature of the street gang, females within the gang are expected to take up male roles that include murders, kidnappings, extortions and other violent crimes. Additionally, females within various MS-13 cliques take up support roles aswell, usually serving as a clique member's girlfriend or wife, sometimes even assisting with monetary issues for the clique, such as keeping track of which member owes which sum of money to the clique's higher leadership. Although, some Los Angeles cliques seldom accept women and prefer to operate much more like their El Salvadoran counterparts. This is especially seen with cliques that recruit a higher percentage of 'paisa' type individuals. One clique that operates like a Salvadoran MS-13 gang in Los Angeles is the Fulton Locos, who are are said to be the most vicious MS-13 clique in the San Fernando Valley area. The Mara Salvatrucha in Los Angeles (Los Santos) and some other West Coast states are also much more prone to the extreme use of tattoos than their Eastcoast and Central American counterparts. The gang in Los Angeles doesn't experience the same need to hide their tattoos as the gang does in other parts of the state. This is mainly because many MS-13 members on the West Coast are the American-Born children of people from Central America, as opposed to being illegal immigrants and thus, can't be sent back to Central America where their tattoos would put them in grave danger. However, gang bylaws in Los Angeles dictate that the usage of tattoos amongst the gang has to be earned. For an MS-13 member, every single tattoo they get is supposed to have a meaning, usually consisting of an act committed for the benefit of the MS-13 gang. Tattoos above the neck however, are rare for MS-13 members in Los Angeles. Face tattoos are also still commonplace amongst some MS-13 cliques such as the Normandie Avenue Locos. INSET; V.SUR13 (Varrio Surenos 13) crossed out by MS-13 NLS (Mara Salvatrucha Normandie Locos) (Image taken in Koreatown, Los Angeles) Relations between Chicano Barrios (Surenos) and Salvadoran Barrios (Maras) The relations between Central Americans and Mexicans has for the most part been shaky for years. Some Chicano gangs to this day will refuse to accept those with Central American roots into their street gangs and most of the time also refuse to accept those born in Mexico. In these gangs' most prominent eras, they were known for discriminatory actions against the Central American population, thus causing criminal elements throughout the Salvadoran community such as the Mara Salvatrucha Stoners to viciously fight back against them, usually employing much more violent and heartless tactics than their Mexican counterparts. This rivalry became worse tenfold when a Salvadoran woman was sexually assaulted by a Chicano street gang. This caused the Mara Salvatrucha to become even more violent and even to start engaging in sex crimes against the rival gang's members. As a result of these factors, most members of Sureno gangs either fear or deeply despise the Mara Salvatrucha, they see them as nothing but abominations. Many Sureno gangs would much prefer a Norteno street gang to pop up in their community, than an MS-13 or 18th Street offshoot. While 18th Street is a lot less disliked than MS-13 in terms of their relationship with Sureno street gangs, they're also the universal enemies of just about all Mexican-American barrios throughout the United States. On the other side of the coin, to the Maras, especially to MS-13, the Surenos are looked at as puppets and hypocrites. This has caused some MS-13 cliques to go out of their way to specifically target Mexican-Americans for their crimes. This is despite the fact that in Southern California the Mara Salvatrucha and 18th Street are formally labelled as Surenos. The Mexican Mafia's relationship with the Maras is different to their relationship with the Surenos, despite the Mexican Mafia's ranks mainly being comprised of Surenos. In Los Angeles, the Mara Salvatrucha and 18 gangs are beholden to the Mexican Mafia, where they pay extortionate fees for their protection in state prisons and also for permission to sell drugs and commit crimes in their territories. It is likely that without the Mexican Mafia's influence, MS-13 wouldn't exist in Southern California. It's a symbiotic relationship which is based upon an uneasy alliance of convenience which was formed in the 1990's as a result of the Mexican Mafia's attempts to stop the Salvadorans vs Chicanos conflict in the streets. In order to fully understand the conflict between traditional Surenos & The Maras, one must look into the lore of the Salvadoran barrios of Los Angeles. Both sides believe that they're in the right, both sides believed that one side is better than the other, both sides harbor intense ammounts of hatred towards eachother. This is shown by how most Mexican gang members dislike MS-13 and even claim to be 'MSK' (Mara Salvatrucha Killers), even those in the most southern parts of Los Angeles and even in San Diego where there's close to no MS-13 presence. MS-13 are universally hated and despised by close to 90% of Sureno gangs, along with distrusted and labelled as nothing more than rapists who seek to target Mexican-American women and drag them away to be violently raped. MS-13 do indeed target Mexican-American and Mexican women at times. 18th Street does the same thing. Exactly like how some Surenos like to target Salvadoran, Honduran and Guatemalan women. While MS-13 are formerly classified as Surenos and some even proudly admit to being part of the Sureno program, others despise Surenos and see MS-13 as something more. An organization that's not UNDER the Mexican-Mafia, but instead on their level. MS-13 sees their alliance with the Mexican-Mafia as one of convenience, not one that's entirely needed. MS-13 feeds the Mexican Mafia with drug money and kills for them when they ask, all in exchange for protection while locked up in San Andreas state prisons. A similar fate to what the 18th Street Gang experienced to a lesser extent. How to roleplay as a resident living in a Mara's territory & Joining a Mara If you intend to create a character that lives in a Mara territory, Decide early what kind of person you want your character to be along with how old he/she is going to be. (If you wish for your character to eventually be inducted into a Mara, he/she MUST be a teenager in most cases, there's usually no exceptions. If not? You can pick whatever age you'd like). First off decide what nationality you want your character to be from. A gang like Ms-13 or 18th Street is more likely to accept almost any central american nationality, aswell as Mexicans and in some cases, Blacks, Whites and Asians, but that'd require much more development on the joining member's part. Decide aswell on your background story and your character's personality traits. If he/she's Latino, Are your character's parents illegal? Is your character himself or herself illegal? Does he or she speak English? Or just Spanish? As for why your character would want to join a gang? Well here are the main reasons teenagers anywhere join street gangs, among other reasons. Kids that want to be or feel tough Kids that want to be respected Kids that want to feel loved or needed Kids that want to be apart of something bigger than them Kids with broken families or mental issues Kids that want to be feared by other people They love feeling like they're powerful Kids and Teenagers with these personality traits and similar personality traits are more likely to join a street gang or a Mara than a sheltered boy who knows nothing about street gangs or the way they operate. Most of these teenagers come from broken homes and have had some sort of traumatic event happen to them or somebody they know at some point in their lives. They often have little to no actual parent figures at home and thus turn to the streets and to the Maras searching for some sort of surrogate family. Moving on, your character should 60% of the time be from the same neighbourhood as the Mara that you wish to have your character become apart of, the only real exception to this is if your character came from Central America or Mexico years beforehand as a young child. Nobody is gonna go through a move from Chicago or Miami to the slums of Los Santos just to get affiliated to a street gang when he/she arrives, that's senseless and a shitty, lazy way of portraying a character. They'd most likely attend local schools with gang members. As a teenager from the ghetto, your character (Even non affiliated) would most likely very vividly understand the street gang culture that goes on within the neighbourhood, he'd hear shots and sirens at night, he'd see drunken cholos hanging out in alleyways and at the park. He'd know which gang is which, what their graffiti looks like aswell as who they don't get along with, where their territory is located and he'd most likely know exactly how the area he lives in is carved up when it comes to street gangs. It's not meant to be HARD for people to become affiliated to a Mara, but it's best you dont approach leading members with face tattoos straight like that, you're not gonna get any respect that way. Instead, befriend the members that are more around your character's age range. They're your character's key into the gang. If he or she plays their cards right, your character should very easily become a full blown gang member. A good idea and something great to roleplay would for your character to be a tagger, basically a member of a local tagger crew, a young cholo or chola. (You could either form a tagger crew IC with a couple of friends, or roleplay that your character is simply a lone tagger/graffiti artist.) He or she would most likely come into contact with the gang eventually and over time be jumped in, leaving his or her crew (If he/she is in one ofc) behind to become a member of whatever gang resides in his neighbourhood. Just know that your character doesn't actually have to kill anybody to become a valuable part of a Mara. MS-13 for example is heavily focused around money and they thrive through their drug sales. Yes, Maras are an extremely violent type of street gang, but that doesn't mean every single person that hangs out with or is affiliated with the gang is a murderous psychopath, which is why people need to consider WHAT they're gonna RP before they come IG and roleplay with the faction. 90% of young MS-13 and 18st members in LA haven't actually killed anybody yet, shot at them maybe. But not killed. Lastly, please don't try to carry your character as a hardened gangbanger right off the bat. It's okay to be a rowdy teenager that's extremely down for his or her gang, but keep it realistic. Your character isn't a killer yet, he/she's a teenager from the slums of LS who most likely hangs out with a local street gang. Your goal at this point should be to befriend members of a gang of your choice and over time work your way into the gang. This process could take days, weeks or even months. Depending on a variety of factors. Your ultimate goal is to show interest in the gang when possible and to work your way towards a jump in. The General Environment The type of areas and environments that spawn street gangs are usually riddled with broken homes, low income families and drug abuse. As mentioned before, your character has most likely experienced or is currently experiencing at least one, if not all of these issues. Most people in these neighbourhoods are generally very distrustful of the police and some may even fear calling the police or fear the police in general. Maybe out of fear of being deported or fear of retaliation from the local street gangs. It's highly recommended that you do some sort of research on neighbourhoods such as these, take Westlake/Macarthur Park, Mid City, Southern Koreatown (Pico Union / Rampart) and pretty much all of South Central Los Angeles as inspiration. You can find countless articles and stories about life in these neighbourhoods through a simple google search and it's highly recommended that you do. Not only are these neighbourhoods plagued with fear, drugs and crime but they're also heavily populated by undesirable people (Such as robbers, kidnappers, rapists and child molesters) who prey on people within said communities. Roleplay proper precautions when RPing in the ghetto, basically remember that your character is legit from one of the most violent neighbourhoods in Los Santos. He/she's not walking through Vinewood or Rockford Hills. Salvadoran/Central American slang: Chucho - Word that means 'dog'. Used amongst friends often. Maje - Means 'dude'. Used very often. Vergiada - A beating. Generally a rather intense one. Chivo – 'ok, fantastic, nice, amazing' Ba firme - Similar to the phrase 'yeah, aight'. It's what you'd say if you don't particularly believe what you're being told, or if you don't particularly have anything to say about what you're being told. Ba simon - Pretty much the same as the above. Pretty much what you say when you don't have anything to say, but you're letting the person know that you hear what they're saying. Abaya - 'Go away' Vaya pues - Literally tanslates to 'Go, then' Literally, “go then,” the expression is used in place of “okay.” Ahora - 'Now' Vicho or Vicha – 'Kid'. The word 'vicha' is used a lot amonst female Salvadorans. Cipote or Cipota – teenager or young person Puya – 'wow'. Pretty much expresses suprise. Casaca - 'Bullshit' Chero - A slang term referring to a close friend or ally. Desmadre - This is also used in Mexico, it means “chaos” or “disorder”, usually accompanied by the verb “armar” which means “to assemble”. So if you hear “armar un desmadre”, you're likely about to witness a complete shit-show. Dundo - Similar to “dumb” Seco - Translates as “dry” but is Salvadoran slang for someone skinny, and is said in a light hearted manner. Cubreme - Cover me Marero - A gangster. In LA the word Marero refers to an MS-13 member, in Central-America and Mexico the word Marero refers to a gang member in general. Morra - A woman. Generally a dumb one Que haces / Que haciendo - 'What's going on' or 'What are you doing?' Q'vo - A greeting. It's like saying 'Hello' or 'Sup' Cabal - 'Exactly!' Vos - 'You' Que pedo - What's up (Example: Que pedo con vos? = What's up with you?' Pedo - Despite being used in the phrase 'que pedo', the word pedo has several meanings in Spanish. Most use the word to refer to an issue, a problem. (Example1: I've got pedo with that fool over there = I've got a problem that guy over there, I wanna do something about it) or an ongoing beef (Example2: North Rancho? Nah, that's Aztecas hood. We've got pedo wit them = North Rancho? No, That's a rival territory, we're involved in a beef with them) Tunco - pig; usually refers to a part of a butchered pig. Turco - derrogative term used to call Palestinians who migrated to El Salvador. This term comes from Turkish (person who comes from Turkey), since they had a Turkish passport which they had to use to enter the country. Culero - Offensive and derogative term for a homosexual man (equivalent to f*g). Culío - Afraid Vá?! -Interjection meaning approximately, 'do you agree’ or simply stressing the affirmative statement to which it serves as an ending. Vergón - positive exclamation, an equivalent of the slang 'cool’. Puyar - To injure someone with a pointed and sharp object. Also, to speed up a vehicle or to urge someone to quicken its pace on doing something. Cuetear - The act of shooting someone; usually entails an official government agent (police, military) shooting, not usually used for gang shootings. Also popularly used by the pre-war generations as a threat: -te voy a cuetear- = “I’m going to shoot (cuetear) you.” Chota - Police, usually plural, as in 'la chota’ (the police). Aguacatero - Said of a dog. A stray dog or one considered inferior or of mixed breed; a mutt.
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  29. DEPARTMENT BUREAUS AND DIVISIONS Office of the Chief of Police Staff Team The LSPD Staff Team consists of all officers ranked Deputy Chief of Police and above. The staff team or staff management group represent the highest echelon of department personnel; by en large they are responsible for managing all department bureaus and hold the responsibility of liaising with both the Mayor and other relevant government agencies in the State of San Andreas. Command Team The LSPD Command Team consists of all officers ranked between Lieutenant I and Commander. The LSPD Command Team is responsible for the day to day management of the Los Santos Police Department. All officers that are a part of this team hold positions ranging from Divisional Assistant Commander to (Assistant) Bureau Commander. Supervisor Team The LSPD Supervisor Team consists of all officers ranked at Sergeant (regardless of rating) and Detectives that have graduated the supervisor program. The LSPD Supervisor Team represents the backbone of the department. As Senior Non Command Officers, supervisors function as the Department's middle management and are responsible for the liaison between lower non command officers and the LSPD Command and Staff teams. Operations Bureau South Central Area Mission Row Patrol Division The Mission Row Patrol Division is responsible for safeguarding the residents of and property of the South Central Area. The Division aims to be a leader in community policing, making sure that both small, medium-sized businesses in the area feel protected and that the neighbourhoods of the area are clean of any crimes stretching from petty theft to gang violence surrounding some of Los Santos most low-income areas. The Mission Row Patrol Division values the work of our culture and arts scene, making sure that all citizens can feel safe in who they are, as well as making sure that they value the officer presence set in our area. West Valley Area Rockford Hills Patrol Division The Rockford Hills Patrol Division is responsible for safeguarding the lives and property of West Valley residents. The division aims to be a leader in early response times and its dedicated officers work with the community to keep neighborhoods problem-free. The RHPD values its reputation as a division that earns the public trust through efficient, impartial police service. Our mandate is to provide professional and proactive services in partnership with our community, and we are absolutely dedicated to establishing the safest community through exceptional policing. Traffic Division Traffic Division is responsible for enforcing Road Law by use of specialist policing techniques and resources, including the monitoring of traffic, establishment of safety checkpoints and other methods of ensuring road safety. Traffic Division is part of the Mission Row Area Field Training Program The Field Training Program represents the first step for all officers joining the Los Santos Police Department. The Field Training Program facilitates Police Officer III's (Field Training Officers) who train all Police Officer I's throughout their probation, while also providing quality control and other support systems for officers new to the department. Detective Bureau Area Detective Division The Area Detective Division is tasked with the investigation of all crime within a geographic region, responding to investigative requests and performing investigative work into gangs, organised crime, and standalone violence. Area Detectives are assigned to stations and serve specific areas but are administratively under the Detective Bureau. Technical Services Section The Technical Services Section is tasked with providing the bureau, and the department at large, with skilled technical staff in support of investigative efforts, as well as housing the Detective Bureau's functional specialist areas, such as Cyber Crime. The TSS is also home to all civilian forensic investigator staff. Detective Training Program The Detective Training Program is a program undertaken by officers wishing to embark upon a career as a Detective. Completion of the program will allow an officer to be a qualified and graded Detective. Special Operations Bureau Metropolitan Division The Metropolitan Division is responsible for all high-risk law enforcement operations as well as providing specialized tactical assistance to law enforcement officers in the state of San Andreas. The Metropolitan Division consists of four platoons. A platoon is responsible for the division's administrative command while B Platoon and C Platoon are the proactive crime suppression teams, K-9 Platoon specializes in handling canines and D Platoon functions as the department's special weapons and tactics team. Air Support Division The Air Support Division trains pilots and crew for rotary-wing aircraft and fixed-wing aircraft. The Air Support Division is responsible for providing aviation support to law enforcement officers on the front lines and to aid in an operational capacity such as with pursuits and search and rescue. Crisis Negotiation Team The Crisis Negotiation Team or CNT is the section of the Los Santos Police Department tasked with bringing a negotiated solution to crisis situations, from the resolution of hostage situations and suicidal persons to barricaded suspects. Personnel & Training Bureau Police Training & Education Division The Police Training and Education Division is responsible for creating and supplying officers with additional training and educational courses beyond those provided by the Police Academy and Field Training Program in the forms of courses to attend or additional training material to study. Command Training Program The LSPD Command Training Program is responsible for training and certifying all-new Command Officers. The Command Training Program aims to provide the highest possible quality training for prospective Command Officers and is responsible for liaising all applications with the Staff Team. Supervisor Training Program The LSPD Supervisor Training Program is responsible for training and certifying all eligible patrol staff and detectives as department supervisors. With their responsibility to train the backbone of the department, the Supervisor Program provides a mix of in the field and administrative training to help personnel progress in their law enforcement careers. Firearms Training Section The Firearms Training Section is the section of the Los Santos Police Department that provides all tactical- and firearm-related training and courses to all officers Personnel Division The Personnel Division manages all civilian assets that are in the employ of the Los Santos Police Department and do not fulfil a role as a sworn Law Enforcement Officer. Administrative Services Bureau Recruitment & Academy Division The Recruitment and Academy Division is responsible for the department's in-take and training of new police recruits. Prospective officers go through the recruitment process and academies hosted by RAD prior to becoming fully-fledged LSPD officers. Besides recruitment of sworn law enforcement personnel, the Recruitment and Academy Division also provides in-service training to further the skills of existing personnel and is responsible for maintaining the department's ride-along scheme. Firearms Licensing Division The Firearms Licensing Division coordinates and distributes firearms licensing to civilians, including the firearms application process. Professional Standards Bureau Internal Affairs Group The Internal Affairs Group consists of three parts, the Investigation Division and the Board of Rights. The Investigation Division is responsible for conducting investigations and handling reports on officers and involved parties internally, whilst the Board of Rights handles disciplinary appeals for employees of the Department. Media Relations & Community Affairs Division The Media Relations and Community Affairs Division enhances the reputation and brand image of the LSPD through the effective management of communications to the media, members of the public, and its own employees. DEPARTMENT CAREER LADDER COMMAND OFFICERS CAPTAIN Example of roles: Commanding Officer of an area Commanding Officer of a division LIEUTENANT Example of roles: (Assistant) Commanding Officer of a division Watch Commander of a station Metropolitan Platoon Leader SERGEANTS SERGEANT II Example of roles: (Assistant) Commanding Officer of a division Officer-in-Charge in a division or unit Patrol Sergeant of a station Metropolitan Assistant Platoon Leader Metropolitan Team Leader SERGEANT I Example of roles: Patrol Sergeant of a station Officer-in-Charge in a division or unit Senior ranking officer in a division or unit Metropolitan (Assistant) Team Leader Internal Affairs Investigator POLICE OFFICER III+1 Example of roles: Senior Lead Officer Chief Pilot Traffic Supervisor Metropolitan (Assistant) Team Leader Training Coordinator Recruitment Relations Officer DETECTIVES DETECTIVE III Example of roles: (Assistant) Commanding Officer of a Detective division Detective-in-Charge in a Detective division DETECTIVE II Example of roles: Detective-in-Charge of a specialised section or area of expertise Detective Supervisor Specialized Division Detective Internal Affairs Investigator DETECTIVE I Example of roles: Case-Carrying Investigator Specialised investigator Gang, Vice, or Homicide investigator Area Detective POLICE OFFICER III Example of roles: Field Training Officer SWAT Operator K-9 Handler Detective-Trainee POLICE OFFICER II Example of roles: Traffic Officer Tactical Support Officer Recruitment officer Pilot POLICE OFFICER I Example of roles: Officer in training Media Relations Officer Firearms licensing Officer CONNECT WITH US FACEBROWSER Los Santos Police Department Metropolitan Division Mission Row Area Detectives GTA WORLD FORUMS Community Discussion: The Police Department & You 114: The Metropolitan Division Screenshots Thread LOS SANTOS POLICE DEPARTMENT FORUMS Joining the LSPD Reporting a Player Licencing Desk Press, Events & Community
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